Q Block, the home of Environment and Technology, requires map-reading skills and trigonometry to navigate. // Credit: Will Anderson
Q Block, the home of Environment and Technology, requires map-reading skills and trigonometry to navigate. // Credit: Will Anderson

A UWE student who was lost in Q Block for five days has been found.

Dan Martins, a Journalism and PR student who studies at Bower Ashton spent five days inside the notorious building located on Frenchay Campus.

Medics arrived early this morning after the alarm was raised by group of students who found him sleeping on a sofa in the Hive.

The students said they realised something wasn’t right because they noticed he “smelt” and looked like he “needed a shower”.

Julie, second year Maths student said, “I nudged him to wake him, and he spoke but he was making no sense. He looked really pale. That’s when I decided to call a paramedic”.

Martins, 21, said he had asked a number of people to show him the exit but each time he followed their directions he became lost again.

“I couldn’t find my way onto the ground floor to get out. There appeared to be no staircase to get down there. I was stuck on the second floor”.

“Eventually I found my way to the Base, so I was completely thrown when I found out I was on the third floor. I was exhausted and convinced there was no way out so I decided to hunker down and get some sleep”.

Artists impression of the interior of the building. // Credit: Flikie
Artists impression of the interior of the building. // Credit: Flikie

It is understood that he entered the building in the evening of Thursday 26th March after he attended a talk held in R Block. Flat-mates last saw him Thursday morning and “assumed he had gone home for Easter”.

Martins explained that he was able to obtain food as there was “a few quid” in his wallet, and he filled his water bottle from the cooling machines.

It was Martins’ first visit to Frenchay campus. He stated that he doesn’t ever wish to go there again after enduring what he described as a “hideous ordeal”.

It is believed that Martins suffered from spatial disorientation, a type of severe confusion which convinces the sufferer that what they believe to be true is, no matter how ludicrous it may be.

The phenomenon affects pilots and divers predominately, but can be triggered by normal conditions such as blindfolding or any scenario where a ‘loss of reference point’ occurs.

Martins is currently taking a break at home and appears to have made a full recovery.

 

 

By Belinda George and Phil Mansell