Knitting rocks! You can make things like this.

To find out more about knitting trends and trendy knitting, or simply for some inspiration, visit the extended ‘Knitting history’ exhibition still running at Bristol Central Library, and check out: www.knitthecity.com.

What’s the idea/philosophy behind what you do?

Knit the City have an ongoing mission to hark back to woolly thoughts of grandmas and nice cups of tea by the fire, then take that stereotype by the blue rinse and drags it kicking and screaming into the street to wrap round a lamppost, blanket a bollard, or swathe a signpost. We tell slightly disturbing and frighteningly sweet and squishy city stories via the medium of yarn and our sticks and hooks.

How often do Knit the City get together?

In the early days we spent much of our time training in the ancient arts of yarnstorming with our mysterious woollen-hooded master in our secret wool-lined Knit the City bunker. Now we are skilled ninjas of the knit we meet up less often to discuss our sneaky stitching and eat cake. We’re all bound together by an invisible thread of yarnstorming at all times though.

How many members make up Knit  The City?

There are seven of us: Deadly Knitshade, The Purple Purler, Shorn-a the Dead, The Bluestocking Stitcher, Lady Loop, The Fastener and Knitting Ninja.

Is it primarily a female group, or is there a mix?

We are all female. It’s just how it happened. A male yarnstormer is not out of the question, however.

How do you decide on new projects/ how long does it normally take to complete a project?

Deciding on new projects can come from any inspiration. A page in an ancient library book, the coo of a one-legged pigeon on a statue, a dream in which the whole of London is covered in eyelash yarn. There is no one way. The Yarn Corps wander the streets of London often as we go about our daily lives in our every day identities though. Now and then the city gives us a shove while we’re out and about and screams for a bit of stitching.

The telephone boxes are pretty impressive, what is your favourite example of “Guerrilla Knitting” to date?

If we were to pick favourite’s everyone else would get jealous and sulk at us. We heart all examples of yarnstorming from the bollard blanketers to the more creative creeping knit and crocheters. It takes a brave and slightly wool-crazy individual to get their yarnstorm on. We love them all. Also, the phone box was just a cosy. We’ve moved on from just covering stuff in knitting now. We’re doing all kinds of weird and wonderful things with our wool. Every yarnstorm tells a tale.

Any chance of Bristol seeing any of your work?

A photo of our phone box cosy was displayed at Bristol Library when they did an exhibition on the history of knitting. That’s pretty much as close as we’ve come. We’d encourage Bristolian knitters to get out there are yarnstorm it up themselves though. We bet you have tons of places that are lacking in woolly sunshine and shadow.

Any hints about what can we expect in the future?

If we told you, sadly, we’d have to kill you. It’s so hard to get gore out of fibre that we’d rather just keep it to ourselves. Keep an eye on us, though, something knitty this way comes…