There are just some albums you can’t leave alone. Those albums that are timeless, you can listen to in whatever mood. They are musically, lyrically and emotionally perfect. You want to share them with the world, let everyone realise you’ve been right all along, and that your favourite album is in fact the Greatest Album Of All Time. But what if this album that you cherish is so deeply embarrassing, so unacceptable, that you never tell anyone? Well this is your chance to let it all out. In this new feature for WestWorld, we have invited our contributors to bare all and tell us their most embarrassing album love. 

Maybe I need some rehab or maybe I just need some sleep.

To say that my album choice is different to Christian’s is to compare hot and cold, light and dark, Coldplay and Ke$ha. Imagine for a moment, being asked over and over again ‘what’s your favourite album?’ ‘what’s your favourite artist?’ ‘what’s your favourite song?’ and through gritted teeth having to say something respectable like Los Campesinos! when your heart is screaming ‘KEEEEE$$$$$HHHHAAAAA’ like Marlon Brando at the the end of Streetcar Named Desire. Sadly though this young man has learned the hard way that most people don’t have enough love in their hearts for the woman you hold dearest, but now, vindicated by Christian’s boldness I say without fear, my favourite album is Animal by Ke$ha.

Kesha-Animal-Album-Cover-Art-large
Credit: RCA Records

Where to begin? The opening track and club anthem ‘Your Love is My Drug’ is a prophetic mediation on love itself in an upbeat, melodic and catchy way. This song, as much as it sounds like any other monotonic pop BaNgA, has a far more relate-able, with Ke$ha offering a feeling within the song that one and all have felt at one point; the feeling of do they don’t they,  which is perhaps a darker lamentation of feeling so dependent on someone, that their love is in fact a drug. A song so engrained in popular music is without a doubt ‘Tik Tok’, the song which loudly announced that there was a new queen in town and her name has more dollars in than all y’all. The catchy chorus and pounding drums ensnare you within this world of glitter and party spirit, a world I saw first hand when I saw her live in Paris whilst interrailing, a world that was so dazzling I could barely contain my excitement. Let me tell you she was sensational, the way she put on a show blew me away, that and the fact her mum ran onstage in a penis suit but you get the picture.

Seeing Ke$ha live did give me a greater insight to what she is trying to do, but in an unexpected way. The people there were so eclectic, neither limited by age, sex or race which in itself was fascinating. I thought how can a b-list pop singer (in most people’s eyes (obviously not mine)) attract such an assortment of people? You’re probably thinking that this guy is mad, reading into some debauch and quite frankly terrible singer’s music. If you listen to ‘Animal’, the title song, you begin to get a sense of why and see a different of my beloved. The message is one of acceptance, tolerance, fraternity, it takes on a more transcendental tone giving us the listener something wildly different to so many of the other indifferent popstars churning out monotonous corporate rubbish. She represents a minority that feel that they have a voice in her, so not only does she have the sleazy voice of a dirty angel, she cares about those who feel marginalised.

The many faces of Ke$ha have appealed to me on a variety of levels, she is without a doubt the one artist that never fails to get me ready for a night out and the inevitably sordid dancing then she is also one that I relax to, allowing the lyrics to wash over me like a sexy lullaby. Animal has been there through the good times, bad times, drunk times and weird times, slowly winning over some of my closet friends one at time mainly because I’m too frightened to show too many at once, but nonetheless undergoing the change from anti-Ke$ha to pro, person to animal (as Ke$ha’s fan base is named) from indifferent to Enlightened.

By Jack Wilson